Trucker Fatigue Article Looks at Tired Truckers' Impact on U.S. Highways

 

Langdon & Emison attorney David Brose has published the analytical article, “Driver fatigue: Analysis from accident litigation involving trucks and heavy vehicles,” in the October 8, 2013 edition of Automotive Journal.  This article breaks down safety statistics related to the trucking industry. and the various ways that tired truckers can endanger U.S. highways.  The work, published by Thomson Reuters, examines how recent lawsuits have dealt with that issue.

“Fatigue presents a danger not only to the motoring public, but also to truck drivers and their passengers,” David writes.  “It is a factor in an estimated 15 percent of all single vehicle fatal truck crashes, and has been identified as the most frequent contributor to crashes in which a truck driver is fatally injured.  That fatigue would create such a danger is not surprising, as studies show that being awake for more than 20 hours results in an impairment equal to a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent, the legal limit in all states.  Despite decades of recognition of the problems caused by driver fatigue, this issue still presents great peril to the motoring public.”

A veteran of truck accident litigation, David has been practicing law in state and federal courts across the country since earning his J.D. and M.B.A. from the University of Missouri – Columbia.  When he was a partner in a civil litigation defense firm, he defended various Fortune 500 companies in both personal injury and commercial litigation, with an emphasis on product liability and trucking cases. But now David puts that understanding of defense tactics and strategies to work on behalf of victims across the country that have been seriously injured or killed by a wide variety of dangerous products.  He is a member of the American Association for Justice and the Missouri Association of Trial Attorneys, and has been recognized by National Trial Lawyers and “Super Lawyers” as a top young trial attorney.

To read a David Brose full article on the dangers of fatigued truckers, click here.